Prometheus Strangling the Vulture II by Jacques Lipchitz

Prometheus Strangling the Vulture II by Jacques LipchitzPrometheus Strangling the Vulture II by Jacques LipchitzPrometheus Strangling the Vulture II by Jacques LipchitzPrometheus Strangling the Vulture II by Jacques LipchitzPrometheus Strangling the Vulture II by Jacques LipchitzIMG_3781 Lipschitz Prometheus strangling vulture II

“Prometheus Strangling the Vulture II” by the late sculptor Jacques Lipchitz can be found in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. The original “Prometheus Strangling the Vulture” was a 30-foot plaster work cast for the 1938 International Exhibition in Paris. In 1944 the Brazilian government commissioned Lipchitz to sculpt a copy fo the Ministry of Education and Health building in Rio de Janeiro. The sculpture that stands in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden was based on this 1944 version and recast in bronze in 1953.

According to the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden web site:

“The theme of Prometheus emerged as early as 1933 in his work, as a symbol of human progress and determination and a parable for the triumph of democracy over fascism. In the Greek legend, Prometheus stole fire from the gods and bestowed it as a gift on humankind. This so enraged the god Zeus that he had Prometheus chained to a rocky mountainside, to be tortured by a vulture for all eternity. In Lipchitz’s sculptural version of the story, however, Prometheus triumphs over his fate: freed from his chains, he strangles the bird with one hand as he grips the claws in the other.”

It’s curious that the sculpture has such a serious and mythical back story, but then is executed in such a comical style. The hair alone looks like some kind of Elvis wig in play-doh.

Tags:

What do you think?